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  • An article from Supply Chain Digest highlights ARM’s acquisition of Apical, quoting Simon Segars as stating, “Computer vision is in the early stages of development and the world of devices powered by this exciting technology can only grow from here."

 

  • Gary Sims from Android Authority highlights the structure and functions of ARM’s Mali GPU series, noting, “For ARM Mali GPUs, the number of shader cores is denoted by the ‘MPn’ suffix at the end of the GPU name, e.g. Mali T880MP12, which means 12 shader cores. Inside each core there is a complex pipeline which means that new shader operations are being issued while others are being completed, plus there may be more than one arithmetic engine inside each core meaning the core can perform more than one operation at a time.”

 

  • Several reporters including Gareth Beavis from TechRadar highlight the release of the ARM-based Pebble Time 2 and Pebble 2 smartwatch, sharing, “The Pebble Time 2 has an e-ink multi-color display, and the innards have been improved to allow for an ARM Cortex M7 CPU, which should deliver a fairly hefty speed boost over the previous M4 (now being used in the Pebble 2).”
  • An article from Develop highlights the Future Experience Points (FXP) computer games initiative backed by ARM and other industry players, noting, “Industry players working directly with schools and universities through initiatives like Brains Eden and FXP will prepare the games developers of tomorrow with not only the technical but also workplace skills that they need to succeed in the world of work, by giving participants the gold dust opportunity of direct industry mentoring.”

 

  • Uwe Knipping from Future Electronics Germany contributes an article to New Electronics highlighting the variations of ARM-based MCU processor cores, sharing, “There are many reasons why the ARM Cortex-M series of processor cores has come to dominate the market for 32bit microcontrollers. Across the many varieties of Cortex-M cores, design engineers can choose from an array of performance, power consumption and communications capabilities, allowing them to find an ARM-based MCU which will be suitable for almost any application.”

 

  • Many reporters including Jeff Burt from eWeek continue to highlight the formation of CCIX which will enable more efficient servers and emerging data center workloads, quoting ARM’s Lakshmi Mandyam as stating, “[A] one size fits all architecture’ approach to data center workloads does not deliver the required performance and efficiency. CCIX enables more optimized solutions by simplifying software development and deployment of applications that benefit from specialized processing and hardware off-load, delivering higher performance and value to data center customers.”
  • Rory Dear from Embedded Computing Design highlights ARM’s participation at Computex this year, noting, “Expect to see keynote speakers from both organisations, alongside ARM CEO Simon Segars introducing ARM’s collective vision of the IIoT landscape at the CPX Conference (31st May - 1st June, TICC, Taipei) where more than 1500 attendees seek inspiration for their businesses.”

 

  • Karl Freund from Moor Insights and Strategy contributes an article to Forbes highlighting the creation of the Cache Coherent Interconnect for Accelerators (CCIX) by AMD, ARM, Huawei, IBM, Mellanox, Qualcomm and Xilinx, noting, “The potential benefits could be tremendous if they can pull this off, providing plug-and-play compute and network acceleration for whatever processor you choose, while providing much better performance than is available today using the PCIe interconnect upon which today’s system depend.”

 

  • Frederic Paul from Network World highlights a report from IDC which anticipates that connected IoT products and devices will be worth $2.2 trillion in 2020, sharing, “Just as the markets for smartphones and computers gradually mature, edge and cloud infrastructure needs to continue to scale and support trillions of sensors and billions of systems.”
  • Marco Chiapetta contributed an article to Forbes highlighting ARM’s 10nm FinFET news with TSMC, quoting Pete Hutton as stating, “Efficiency is a primary guiding principle in SoC design for premium mobile applications due to increasing demands on device performance. TSMC’s 16FFLL+ process and ARM Cortex processors have already set new standards for efficiency. Our collaboration with TSMC on 10FinFET ensures SoC-wide efficiency that will allow our silicon partners even greater room to innovate while staying within strict power budgets.”

 

  • Several reporters including David Manners from Electronics Weekly report that ST and Arduino will collaborate to develop an ARM-based STAR Otto baseboard, noting, “By adding ST’s broad family of industry-leading STM32 ARM Cortex-M-based microcontrollers to the Arduino universe along with a broad array of ST sensors and other components, makers will have at their fingertips the ability to design, build and manufacture just about anything.”

 

  • Several reporters including John Anon from Android Headlines highlight a demonstration of Xiaomi’s ARM-based Mi Box at Google I/O which will improve the Android TV experience, noting, “Along with the initial announcement, Xiaomi did provide some of the more basic spec details so we do know that the Mi Box comes equipped with 2GB RAM, 8GB storage, is powered by a quad-core ARM Cortex-A53 processor and a Mali 450 GPU.”

 

Lastly, here are some highlights from the week of May 16:

 

  • An article from Cambridge News highlighted the release of ARM’s mobile gaming education kit to address the growing demand for game technology developers.
  • Will Hutton from The Guardian highlighted ARM’s spot on the FTSE 100.
  • Jonathan Trevor and Barry Varcoe from Harvard Business Review highlighted ARM as a leading company for strategic alignment.
  • Several reporters including Tony Quested from Business Weekly highlighted ARM’s acquisition of Apical.
  • Several Tech Day attendees including Josh Walrath from PC Perspective highlighted the 10nm FinFET news with TSMC.
  • Several reporters including Stu Woo from The Wall Street Journal continue to highlight ARM’s acquisition of Apical, noting, “That is how Apical can help, said Mike Muller, ARM’s chief technology officer. Apical has a similar business model to ARM: It doesn’t manufacture anything itself but designs the blueprint for hardware that helps devices with displays or cameras be more efficient. Now ARM can use Apical’s expertise to help it design better microprocessors and chips, and ARM can now also sell Apical’s current designs alongside ARM’s offerings.”

 

  • Several reporters including Jessica Lipsky from EE Times continue to highlight ARM’s 10nm FinFET processor with TSMC, quoting Ron Moore as stating, “Artemis is a small core, so you’re going to get some architectural benefits in leakage, just as much frequency, better power and smaller [size]. Performance between Artemis and an [existing] A-72 [core] are going to be pretty much at the same level.”

 

  • Several reporters including Graham Prophet from EDN Europe highlight the release of the ARM-based Arduino Primo board which will integrate Bluetooth Low Energy and NFC, noting, “The nRF52832 features a 64 MHz, 32-bit ARM Cortex-M4F processor which claims up to 60% more generic processing power compared to competing solutions, with up to ten times the Floating Point and twice the Digital Signal Processing (DSP) performance.”
  • Several reporters including Tony Quested from Business Weekly highlight ARM’s acquisition of Apical, quoting Simon Segars as stating, “The ARM partnership is solving the technical challenges of next generation products such as driverless cars and sophisticated security systems. These solutions rely on the creation of dedicated image computing solutions and Apical’s technologies will play a crucial role in their delivery.”

 

  • Several Tech Day attendees including Josh Walrath from PC Perspective highlight this morning’s 10nm FinFET news with TSMC, noting, “ARM has a history of porting their architectures to new process nodes, but they are being a bit more aggressive here than we have seen in the past.  It used to be that ARM would announce a new core or technology, and it would take up to two years to be introduced into the market.  Now we are seeing technology announcements and actual products hitting the scenes about nine months later.”

 

  • Several reporters including Alun Williams from Electronics Weekly report that Imagination Technologies will collaborate with the Debian Project to develop an operating system for the 64-bit MIPS architecture, sharing, “Imagination says it is donating several high-performance Rhino Labs SDNA-7130 appliances to the Debian Project for port development and maintenance.”
  • Jonathan Trevor and Barry Varcoe from Harvard Business Review highlight ARM as a leading company for strategic alignment, noting, “ARM is possibly one of the best-performing companies you’ve never heard of… Superior technical innovation is at the heart of its strategy and its organizational design. ARM organizes purposefully for innovation by maximizing opportunities for knowledge sharing and collaboration throughout its entire ecosystem comprising thousands of external partners.”

 

  • Several reporters including Paul Krill from InfoWorld highlight the release of Linux 4.6 which offers security improvements and enhancements for ARM processors, sharing, “The foundation also noted the kernel adds performance enhancements and features for 64-bit ARM architecture.”

 

  • Lance Whitney from CNET highlights a report by IDC which revealed a 67 percent increase in global shipments of wearables in Q1, sharing, “The quarter was marked by several strategies designed to capture more customers, the research firm said. For example, a variety of new fitness trackers and smartwatches took the stage at several tech shows.”
  • An article from Cambridge News highlights the release of ARM’s mobile gaming education kit to address the growing demand for game technology developers, quoting ARM’s Khaled Benkrid as stating, “The ARM University Program actively supports curriculum reform and development and we are continuously creating new teaching materials, professional platforms and tools to help our partners respond to an ever-changing industry.”

 

  • Will Hutton from The Guardian highlights ARM’s spot on the FTSE 100, noting, “Innovation is another compelling clarion call; the company’s purpose is to go where no company has gone before – as ARM or Tesla declare.”

 

  • In a contributed article for Forbes, Kevin Krewell from TIRIAS Research highlights the release of NXP’s ARM-based BlueBox computer which will enable self-driving cars for consumers in the near future, sharing, “The BlueBox engine also incorporates the company’s LS2088A embedded compute processor. The LS2088A hosts much of the embedded intelligence and machine learning. The processor integrates eight 64-bit ARM Cortex-A72 cores running at 2 GHz, along with specialized accelerators, high performance communications interfaces and DDR4 memory controllers, making it one of the highest performing embedded products today.”
  • An article from PYMNTS highlights Simon Segars’ interview with the Financial Times discussing ARM’s growing role in the IoT market, noting, “One of the U.K.’s largest global tech companies, ARM Holdings, has plans to contribute to the emerging ‘connected’ market by increasing investments into new software and businesses focused on the IoT.”

 

  • Several reporters including Justin Pot from Digital Trends highlight the release of Jide’s ARM-based all-in-one PC powered by Remix OS 2.0 in collaboration with AOC, noting, “The unit is powered by an Amlogic S905 2GHz, quad core, 64-bit ARM processor, and offers 2GB of RAM.”

 

  • Several reporters including Todd Weiss from eWeek highlight a report by Kantar Worldpanel ComTech which revealed that Android smartphones continued to gain market share in the U.S. and Europe in Q1 this year, sharing, “What's more, the Android share growth in Europe for the period was the highest recorded there in more than two years.”

 

Lastly, here are some highlights from the week of May 9:

  • Gary Marshall from TechRadar highlighted Simon Segars as one of the speakers at Computex this year.
  • Ed Sperling and Ernest Worthman from SemiEngineering highlighted ARM’s insight on the security implications of connected devices.
  • James Batchelor at Develop is among the reporters who covered the announcement that Geomerics’ Enlighten technology is being used by Australian real estate firm, Yugen, as a tool for prospective home buyers.
  • Lauren Fedor and Sarah Gordon of the Financial Times featured ARM’s transition to new software for connected devices and the IoT.
  • Ed Sperling at Semiconductor Engineering highlighted ARM’s participation in a discussion on the role of tools and IP in advanced packaging.
  • Stan Schroeder from Mashable highlights the BBC’s initiative to educate students on programming via the ARM-based micro:bit computer.
  • Ed Sperling from Semiconductor Engineering highlighted ARM’s insight on power-centric chip architectures.
  • Ann Steffora Mutschler from Semiconductor Engineering also quoted Zach Shelby in an article highlighting ARM’s vision of IP business models.
  • Rich Nass and Brandon Lewis from Embedded Computing Design reported that ARM’s Rhonda Dirvin will deliver a keynote address at Embedded TechCon next month.
  • Ed Sperling from Semiconductor Engineering highlights ARM’s insight on power-centric chip architectures, quoting Zach Shelby as saying, “We’re seeing 32-bit and 64-bit microcontrollers making their way into MEMS pretty quickly. But the problem is how we get the right types of software applications that are high volume enough that they do the same things over and over. FPGA doesn’t quite work for low-power applications. If you do specialized mixed-signal vision detection algorithms on silicon, you have to use a microcontroller, but it’s the same application over and over again.”

 

  • Ann Steffora Mutschler from Semiconductor Engineering also quotes Zach Shelby in an article highlighting ARM’s vision of IP business models. She writes, “When you look at what’s happening in compute at the edge, that’s all about specialized applications. It’s about being able to process data in the right way for the kind of compute load that we have. We’re seeing a huge change in the type of SoCs people are doing.”

 

  • Rich Nass and Brandon Lewis from Embedded Computing Design report that ARM’s Rhonda Dirvin will deliver a keynote address at Embedded TechCon next month. They write, “Rhonda Dirvin, ARM's Director of IoT Verticals, will explore key details of how ARM can be the start of a secure solution, but that's just the tip of the iceberg. She'll go into the tradeoffs to consider and the various approaches that are available when designing secure systems around ARM IP.”
  • Lauren Fedor and Sarah Gordon of the Financial Times feature ARM’s transition to new software for connected devices and the IoT, quoting Simon Segars as saying, “A lot of people that we talk to equate ARM to mobile and nothing else, and so have a view that diversification is a future project, when actually we’ve been working on this for a long time. It’s already a diversified business, we have seen a lot of growth outside of mobile.”

 

  • Ed Sperling at Semiconductor Engineering highlights ARM’s participation in a discussion on the role of tools and IP in advanced packaging, quoting ARM Fellow Rob Aitken as stating, “ARM started out selling hardened CPUs, then changed over to soft CPUs. We check from time to time to see if anyone wants them hardened. They usually don’t.”

 

  • Stan Schroeder from Mashable highlights the BBC’s initiative to educate students on programming via the ARM-based micro:bit computer. Schroeder writes, “Besides its 32-bit ARM Cortex M0 processor and 16K of RAM (sounds like a pithy number but you don't need more for programming basics) on the board, it has a micro USB connector, a battery connector, two programmable buttons and 25 programmable LEDs, which you can use to build cool projects.”
  • James Batchelor at Develop is among the reporters covering the announcement that Geomerics’ Enlighten technology is being used by Australian real estate firm Yugen as a tool for prospective home buyers. Batchelor writes, “As part of a partnership with ARM, Yugen will be using Geomerics’ Enlighten tool to simulate the lighting in virtual models for people unable to visit the buildings they are planning to buy or invest in.”

 

  • Several reporters, including Fred Donovan of FierceMobileIT, highlight a forecast by ABI Research that forecast standalone application processor shipments targeting mobile devices to surpass 1 billion by 2020. Donovan writes, “ABI expects the market for custom CPUs to become increasingly wedged between captive vendor processors in the high-end and reference designs that systematically use ARM Cortex in the low-end and mid-range.”

 

  • Reporters including Kevin Parrish at Digital Trends report on the leaked benchmarks of Intel’s “Kaby Lake” Core i7-7700K processor. Parrish notes, “The new Kaby Lake processors are expected to be officially revealed during Computex 2016 in June followed by a commercial release in Q3 2016.”
  • Gary Marshall from TechRadar highlights Simon Segars as one of the speakers at Computex this year, noting, “This year, those trends include the Internet of Things, Machine Learning and Device Mesh, and speakers include ARM CEO Simon Segars, Qualcomm GM of Connectivity Rahul Patel and Siemens Taiwan president Erdal Elver.”

 

  • Ed Sperling and Ernest Worthman from SemiEngineering highlight ARM’s insight on the security implications of connected devices, quoting Zach Shelby as stating, “Existing architectures are prone to attack. So is the channel between the device and the Internet. This needs to be dealt with at every level, from secure manufacturing to key rotation to efficient crypto. With every system you need to look at end-to-end security.”

 

  • Sheetal Kumbhar from IoT Now highlights a report by Machina Research which revealed that smart cities could waste $341 billion by 2025 on non-standardized IoT deployments, sharing, “Incorporating a number of vertical domains, multiple parties, and diverse IT systems, smart cities are a microcosm and good illustration of the wider IoT. As such, they reflect the financial and operational risks associated with fragmentation and complexity in IoT deployments.”
  • Graham Pitcher from New Electronics highlights the release of Alpha Micro’s ARM-based NINA-B111 and B111 Bluetooth Low Energy modules, noting, “NINA-B112 systems are said to feature an ARM Cortex-M4F MCU, a Bluetooth stack, an antenna and a powerful radio transceiver, enabling them to be designed into a range of IoT sensors and actuators.”

 

  • David Manners from Electronics Weekly reports Microchip has introduced an ARM-based hardware-encrypted MCU that will add security to IoT devices, sharing, “In addition, since the CEC1302 is a full 32-bit microcontroller with an ARM Cortex-M4 core, adding security functionality only results in a small additional cost.”

 

  • Gavin O’Malley from MediaPost highlights a survey by UBS Evidence Lab that forecasts modest growth in the smartphone market, writing, “The data suggests stabilization in the medium-term for the smartphone market, with marginally improved replacement rates expected in the U.S. and China.”

 

Lastly, here are some highlights from the week of May 2:

    • Ann Steffora Mutschler from SemiEngineering included ARM’s insight on the impact of change in processor designs.
    • An article in Global Trade Magazine highlighted a survey by Sungard Availability Services, which revealed that Cambridge is the best UK city for business success.
    • An article in Cambridge News highlighted ARM as being involved with a Future Experience Points (FXP) event, which will provide students with practical computing experiences.
    • Ed Sperling from Semiconductor Engineering highlighted ARM’s insight on the shift toward application-specific solutions in the semiconductor market.
  • Ed Sperling from Semiconductor Engineering highlights ARM’s insight on the shift toward application-specific solutions in the semiconductor market, quoting Zach Shelby as stating, “We’re seeing this is in augmented reality, as well. There is really interesting stuff happening on gesture recognition and 3D cameras. The challenge of moving natural gesture recognition and pattern recognition and even more complex things in downloads from those sensors will get really interesting.”

 

  • Several reporters including Neil Tyler from New Electronics highlight the release of Infineon’s XMC Digital Power Explorer Kit from RS Components, noting, “The kit also features two Infineon ARM Cortex-M based XMC-microcontroller control cards, as well as the company’s DAVE v4 IDE software development platform for XMC microcontrollers, which is a free-of-charge code-generation system.”

 

  • Several reporters including David Meyer from Fortune report the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will create an advisory committee chaired by Intel CEO Brian Krzanich to support safer regulations with drones, noting, “The agency’s announcement closely followed that of a new drone advocacy group in the U.S. that includes Cisco, CNN and various drone startups. The FAA also said it would ease restrictions on students that need to operate drones for education and research purposes.”

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