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  • In a guest post for VentureBeat, Gerard Grech, CEO of Tech City UK, highlights ARM as one of the UK’s biggest tech success stories, noting, “ARM designs the chips that power 95 percent of the world’s smartphones, and its technology effectively put a computer in everyone’s pocket. This summer, the Cambridge-based company, which few consumers had heard of, accepted a $32 billion takeover offer from Japanese conglomerate Softbank.”

 

  • A Cambridge News article highlights ARM’s contributions to Cambridge, noting, “…ARM Holdings, the chip design behemoth bought by Japanese conglomerate SoftBank earlier this month for £24bn, a record fee for a European technology company. Its global headquarters will remain in the city, and is likely to double in size over the next decade. It's likely you have an ARM design in your pocket or handbag, as they power the vast majority of the world's smartphones, as well as other devices, such as the Raspberry Pi.”

 

  • Jonathan Vanian from Fortune highlights Intel’s partnership with Lenovo and Paypal to create fingerprint identification technology for online payments, sharing, “The companies said that the new biometric system for personal computers is based on security standards created by the FIDO Alliance, an industry consortium that’s trying to ensure that emerging security technologies like fingerprint and iris scanners are able to work across different devices.”
  • Peggy Lee from New Electronics highlights the ARM-based single board computers from Novasom included in their recent distribution agreement with Arrow Electronics, noting, “The agreement includes the NOVAsom family of single board computers based upon an ARM Cortex core. The boards are said to combine high performance with low power consumption and feature an innovative engineering concept. Developed by Novasom as a powerful general purpose line, the boards can be integrated and customised into a range of applications with demanding graphics requirements, from low power IoT to digital signage.”

 

  • Peter Clarke of EE Times Europe highlights the Renesas Electronics acquisition of Intersil Corporation, noting, “The ranking will be impacted by Renesas Electronics acquisition of Intersil Corp. for $3.2 billion and the acquisition by Analog Devices Inc. (ADI) of Linear Technology Corp. (LTC) for $14.8 billion.”

 

  • Gil Press from Forbes highlights an IDC report which revealed data management as the predominant theme for the IoT market, sharing, “…to IDC’s question about most important digital transformation projects, survey respondents cited cloud transformation/transition (66%), IoT (32%), and big data/cognitive solutions (27%). IDC noted that these transformational initiatives are interlinked: The cloud gives IoT a platform on which to scale and the IoT lays the foundation for investments in big data and cognitive solutions, to make sense of all data generated by the IoT and residing in the cloud.”

 

Lastly, here are some highlights from the week of September 19:

  • Peter Clarke from EE Times Europe highlights the joint statement between Simon Segars and Masayoshi Son in celebration of the recent acquisition.
  • Richard Wilson from Electronics Weekly highlights the release of Eurotech’s ARM-based ReliaGate IoT development kits for industrial applications.
  • Many reporters including David Meyer from Fortune highlight the launch of ARM’s Cortex-R52 processor for autonomous vehicles and industrial robotics systems.
  • My Social Good News published Dominic Vergine’s post highlighting ARM’s role in advancing the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals.
  • An article from HPCwire highlights ARM’s Alejandro Rico and Chris Adeniyi-Jones as an SC16 Best Paper Award nominees for ‘The Mont-Blanc Prototype: An Alternative Approach for HPC Systems.
  • Several reporters including Graham Prophet from EE Times Europe continue to highlight the launch of ARM’s Cortex-R52 processor, quoting James McNiven as stating, “The Cortex-R52 ... was designed from the ground up to address functional safety... especially in fully autonomous vehicles and robotics systems where specific functionality is required for safety-critical tasks. By documenting the strict development process, fault modelling and supporting software isolation, ARM is enabling a faster route to market for partners addressing these applications.”

 

  • An article from HPCwire highlights ARM’s Alejandro Rico and Chris Adeniyi-Jones as an SC16 Best Paper Award nominees for ‘The Mont-Blanc Prototype: An Alternative Approach for HPC Systems,’ noting, “In this paper, we present the system’s architecture and evaluate both performance and energy-efficiency. Further, we compare the system’s abilities against a production-level supercomputer. Finally, we discuss parallel scalability and estimate the maximum parallel scalability point of this approach.”

 

  • Several reporters including Agam Shah from IDG News report that Intel has collaborated with Oakley to create the Radar Pace smart sunglasses, sharing, “Radar Pace has sensors that can track heart rate, distance, cadence, speed, and other vital workout information. The data is synced with a smartphone connected to Radar Pace via Bluetooth, where an app called Radar Pace App monitors the workout, answers questions, and provides voice recommendations.”
  • Several reporters including Jeff Burt from eWeek continue to highlight the launch of ARM’s Cortex-R52 processor, quoting James Scobie as stating, “Across multiple markets, electronic systems are becoming more complex—including automotive, industrial control and healthcare. Vehicles are beginning to drive themselves, industrial robots are becoming increasingly collaborative, and medical systems are automated to assist with surgery or deliver medication. More of these systems are demanding functionally safe operation and requiring that functional safety be provided at a higher safety level than previous generations of systems demanded.”

 

  • My Social Good News published Dominic Vergine’s post highlighting ARM’s role in advancing the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals. Dominic writes, “As a signatory of the UN Global Compact and the designer of chip technology powering 95 percent of the world’s smartphones, ARM is supporting the stark warning given in the report. The SDGs were put in place in 2015 to address the needs of people in developed and developing countries, emphasizing that no one should be left behind. This sentiment underpins all ARM does within our sustainability programs.”

 

  • Agam Shah from IDG News highlights the release of the ARM-based Poplar TV developer board, noting, “The Poplar board has a 64-bit ARM quad-core processor based on the Cortex A53 design. It has an ARM Mali T720 GPU, which supports 4K HEVC and VP9 video formats.”

The US government shared a new policy document on autonomous cars, highlights include:

  • A 15-point safety report that carmakers will be asked to submit before putting driverless cars on the road, addressing issues such as data recording, privacy, consumer education, and post-crash behaviour
  • A requirement that every new software update for a driverless car must go through the same safety approval process as a new vehicle
  • The sharing of standard quarterly crash reports,and details of cyber security defences and data on every security breach of a car

 

Find out more here: Carmakers give cautious welcome to self-driving guidelines - FT.com

 

 

This makes it very interesting in the context of the new ARM® Cortex®-R52 processor that has been designed for use in autonomous systems such as self-driving cars.

 

What are your thoughts on this?

  • Many reporters including David Meyer from Fortune highlight the launch of ARM’s Cortex-R52 processor for autonomous vehicles and industrial robotics systems, quoting ARM’s James McNiven as stating, “We are helping partners to meet particular market opportunities, especially in fully autonomous vehicles and robotics systems where specific functionality is required for safety-critical tasks.”

 

  • Erna Mahyuni from Stuff highlights the launch of Xiaoyi’s ARM-based mirrorless camera, sharing, “The camera has only two physical buttons but does have a quad-cord ARM CPU, built-in professional ISP image processor as well as support for lossless RAW and HDR with distortion correction and video electronic image stabilisation.”

 

  • Several reporters including Tatyana Shumsky and Don Clark from The Wall Street Journal report that Intel has hired veteran finance executive Bob Swan as its new CFO, sharing, “Mr. Swan comes to Intel at a tumultuous time. The Santa Clara, Calif., company, whose microprocessors power the vast majority of computers, has been grappling with pressures that include a slowdown in the PC industry and a failure to build a major franchise in chips for smartphones.”
  • In a guest post for EE Times, ARM’s Marc Canel details ARM’s partnership with Intercede, Solacia and Symantec to create new security protocol for smart connected products, noting, “The companies agreed that any system would be compromised unless a system-level root of trust between all devices and services providers was established. This led to the definition of the Open Trust Protocol (OTrP), which combines a secure architecture with trusted code management, using on mobile devices proven technologies from banking and data applications.”

 

  • Graham Prophet from EE Times Europe highlights Cypress Semiconductor’s ARM-based microcontrollers for high-speed networking in automotive body electronics, noting, “The MCUs are built in a 40nm embedded charge-trap (eCT) Flash technology for higher performance and reliability, with an ARM Cortex-R5 core at 132-MHz and feature up to 1 MB of high-density embedded flash for application storage. A partial wake-up mode allows the MCUs to minimize average power consumption. Cypress offers a broad range of variations in the series that enables OEM customers to develop derivative solutions.”

 

  • A Fortune article that originally appeared in Reuters reports that Intel partnered with Teva to create wearables that will monitor patients with Huntington’s disease, noting, “Patients will use a smartphone and wear a smartwatch equipped with sensing technology that will continuously measure functioning and movement. The data from the devices will then be wirelessly streamed to a cloud-based platform, developed by Intel, that will translate it, in near real-time, into scores to assess motor symptom severity.”

 

Lastly, here are some highlights from the week of September 12:

  • An article from Onrec highlights job opportunities at Sansa Security.
  • Harry Fairhead from i-Programmer reports that the ARM-based Raspberry Pi computer board has sold 10 million units in four years.
  • An article in Vision Systems Design highlights an Embedded Vision Summit presentation by ARM’s Gian Marco.
  • Several reporters including Agam Shah from IDG highlight the release of Nvidia’s ARM-based Drive PX2 computer aimed at autonomous cars.
  • Àngela Sampayo Montañez from EE Times Europe reports that Onchip is designing the first SoC in Colombia which will be based on the ARM M0 MCU,
  • Several reporters including Julien Happich from EE Times Europe highlight the release of Texas Instruments’ ARM-based SimpleLink dual-band wireless microcontroller.
  • An article in Vision Systems Design highlights an Embedded Vision Summit presentation by ARM’s Gian Marco, noting, “If GPUs are your deep learning coprocessor of choice, take a look at ‘Using SGEMM and FFTs to Accelerate Deep Learning,’ a recent Embedded Vision Summit talk presented by Gian Marco Iodice, a software engineer at ARM. With the emergence of deep learning, Iodice observes, matrix multiplication and the fast Fourier transform are becoming increasingly important, particularly as use cases extend into mobile and embedded devices.”

 

  • Several reporters including Agam Shah from IDG highlight the release of Nvidia’s ARM-based Drive PX2 computer aimed at autonomous cars, sharing, “Car makers, automotive suppliers and researchers are developing autonomous car prototypes based on various Drive PX computers. The Parker CPU has four 64-bit Cortex-A57 cores and two homegrown Denver 2.0 CPU cores, both based on ARM architectures.”

 

  • Several reporters including Josh Beckerman and Takashi Mochizuki from The Wall Street Journal report that Renesas Electronics will acquire Intersil to strengthen its role as an automotive-related semiconductor provider, sharing, “Renesas said its automotive and industrial businesses accounted for 70% of its revenue in the most recent fiscal year, up from 55% three years earlier. The combination with Intersil will help it offer better products for in-vehicle entertainment, battery management and safety systems.”
  • An article from Onrec highlights job opportunities at Sansa Security, quoting Sansa Security’s Yaron Magber as stating, “ARM Israel is growing rapidly and we are currently recruiting talented engineers to join our team, with a number of positions open… The Israeli market is highly competitive and vibrant, with many large multinationals offering compelling benefits, professional challenges, and an international atmosphere. Our local HR team recruits by approaching candidates directly, and may also receive job applications via channels such as LinkedIn or the ARM website.”

 

  • Harry Fairhead from i-Programmer reports that the ARM-based Raspberry Pi computer board has sold 10 million units in four years, noting, “Today's modern line up of Pis spans the range. The Pi 2 is a quad core ARM capable of being a server or doing IoT tasks. The Pi Zero is a simpler and much cheaper single core machine that only costs $5 and the Pi 3 is a quad core 64 bit ARM with built in WiFI and Bluetooth. You could say that there is a Pi for every task at the right price.”

 

  • Several reporters including Tyler Lee from Ubergizmo highlight a rumour from SamMobile revealing that Samsung might license NVIDIA and AMD’s GPU technologies instead of ARM, sharing, “In terms of mobile, NVIDIA no doubt has an advantage over AMD, especially when you consider a few years ago, NVIDIA’s Tegra chipsets could be found on quite a few mobile products, although in recent years the company has scaled down their mobile efforts considerably, but not completely as we have seen in their SHIELD series of mobile gaming devices.”
  • Several reporters including Lucy Burton from The Wall Street Journal highlight SoftBank’s acquisition of ARM in comparison to Micro Focus International’s acquisition of HP’s software business, noting, “Scott Bok, the New York-based CEO of Greenhill said the Micro Focus deal and the recently closed deal by Japan’s SoftBank for the U.K.’s ARM Holdings, are ‘public signs that confirm what we are seeing in private discussions with clients’. He said his firm had been pleasantly surprised by how quickly M&A dialogues had resumed, for inbound and outbound deals from the U.K., in recent weeks.”

 

  • Several reporters including David Manners from Electronics Weekly report that Synopsys has joined GLOBALFOUNDRIES’ FDXcelerator Partner Program to facilitate 22nm FD-SOI (FDX) SoC designs, sharing, “The collaboration enables Synopsys’ tools to enhance support for differentiating GLoFo’s FD-SOI design features, including support for the adaptive body bias that unlocks FDX SoC performance and ultra-low-power operation, while lowering barriers of migration from bulk nodes. This allows engineers to create optimized designs, while minimizing development costs.”

 

  • Junko Yoshida from EE Times highlights an IC Insights report which reduced the IoT semiconductor market’s projected compound annual growth rate from 21.1 to 19.9 percent, sharing, “The market research firm’s slimmed IoT market forecast was triggered by lower sales projections for connected cities applications, said IC Insights. The connected cities segment, as IC Insights defines it, include smart electric meters and infrastructure.”

 

Lastly, here are some highlights from the week of September 5:

 

  • Several reporters including Matthew Gooding from Cambridge News reported that SoftBank has completed its acquisition of ARM.
  • Clemens Valens from Elektor Magazine highlighted BBC’s ARM-based micro:bit computer board.
  • Several reporters including Anthony Spadafora from BetaNews continue to report that SoftBank has completed its acquisition of ARM.
  • Several reporters including Matthew Gooding from Cambridge News report that SoftBank has completed its acquisition of ARM. The article quotes Simon Segars and Masayoshi Son in a joint statement as stating, “We believe that the value of this acquisition is far beyond the combination of two companies. The SoftBank Group touches many elements of the technology sector, from mobile communications to robotics. ARM is the leading semiconductor-based architecture for the digital world. As we move forward together, we will write an important new chapter in the industry's history.”

 

  • Clemens Valens from Elektor Magazine highlights BBC’s ARM-based micro:bit computer board, noting, “Being an ARM mbed-compatible device (implemented in a second ARM Cortex-M0 MCU, an NXP Kinetis KL26), the board can be drag-’n’-drop programmed over USB, but also over the air (OTA) thanks to its Bluetooth radio.”

 

  • Many reporters including David Meyer from Fortune highlight Intel’s acquisition of Movidius in an attempt to improve computer vision applications in connected devices, sharing, “The idea is to be able to do on a mobile device the kind of heavy image interpretation that currently requires remote processing power somewhere off in the cloud. This should allow for quicker reactions and ultimately more autonomous machines.”

At IFA in Berlin this week, we saw the exciting announcement of the Acer R13 Chromebook, as the first ARM big.LITTLE Chromebook to incorporate ‘Energy Aware Scheduling’ (EAS) support in the Linux kernel.

 

This innovative product uses the Mediatek MT8173 system-on-chip.  Inside the Mediatek MT8173 there are two ARM Cortex-A72 ‘Big’ cores for best performance and two ARM Cortex-A53 ‘Little' cores for power efficiency.

mediatek_8173.jpg

 

The Linux kernel used on the device includes EAS, which has been jointly developed by ARM and Linaro.  EAS is a generic solution to allow the Linux scheduler to optimize the performance and energy efficiency of a typical client workload, on a system with asymmetric CPU capacities such as ARM big.LITTLE.

 

EAS_graphic.jpg

 

EAS uses an energy model, which captures the performance and power consumption of the cores in the system at various operating and idle states. The Linux scheduler task placement is modified to provide the required performance at the best energy efficiency.  Optimal performance is achieved by ensuring intensive tasks are running on the big cores. Lighter or less intense periodic tasks will be placed on the little cores, where they can run with higher efficiency.

 

EAS helps enable top performance in portable, thin and light products such as mobile, tablet and clamshell.

 

The ARM/Linaro EAS extensions are being developed in the public domain using public mailing lists with community involvement, along with other advanced power management features.  It’s a great example of how ARM & Linaro are working to improve opensource software running on the latest ARM SoC’s.

 

Last month we also saw that EAS adopted into the Android Common Kernel, so we expect it to appear in future generations of Android devices too.

 

If you’d like more information on Energy Aware Scheduling visit our developer site for EAS or the Linaro blog.

  • Several reporters including Timothy Prickett Morgan from The Next Platform highlight the 64-bit ARMv8-compatible desktop, laptop and server processors from Phytium, sharing, “Phytium was on hand at last week’s Hot Chips 28 conference, showing off its chippery and laptop, desktop and server machines employing its ‘Earth’ and ‘Mars’ FT series of ARM chips. Most of the interest that people showed in the server variants, which are both based on variants of the ‘Xiaomi’ core design that the company has cooked up based on ARMv8 intellectual property licensed from ARM Holdings.”

 

  • Several reporters including Kevin Lee from Tech Radar highlight the release of the Blade Stealth gaming Ultrabook from Razer which incorporates Intel’s new 7th generation Core i7 processor, noting, “Now equipped with a new 7th generation Intel Core i7 processor, the new Razer Blade Stealth should be an even more capable machine for everyday life and gaming. Power aside, the gaming Ultrabook has also been upgraded with double the memory, bumping it up to 16GB of DDR3 RAM and a 1TB PCIe SSD.”

 

  • Matt Hamblen from Computerworld highlights an IDC report which anticipates little to no smartphone growth for 2016, sharing, “The analyst firm also said that iPhone shipments for the entire year will decline by 12% globally compared to 2015, while Windows Phone shipments will decline by 75%. Sales of Android smartphones produced by a number of manufacturers will increase by 6.7%, and grab 85% of the global market for all of 2016.”

 

Lastly, here are some highlights from the week of August 29:

  • In a contributed post for Electronic Products, ARM’s Marc Canel highlights the launch of the Open Trust Protocol (OTrP) which will improve security in IoT and connected devices.
  • Several reporters including Alan R. Frank from IHS Electronics360 highlight the release of Silicon Labs’ ARM-based Thunderboard React developer kit for improved IoT connectivity.
  • Several reporters including Laura Chesters from This Is Money report on news that ARM shareholders have backed the Softbank acquisition.
  • Josh Phillips from Building Design & Construction Magazine reports on the expansion of  ARM’s office space at the Peterhouse Technology Park campus.
  • Julien Happich from EETimes Europe highlights the Embedded Studio from Segger for ARM-based processor solutions.
  • Jeff Burt from eWeek reports on the release of Qualcomm’s ARM-based Snapdragon 821 processor and its existing 820 processor.
  • An article from BusinessCloud highlights the ARM-based micro:bit computer board, quoting ARM’s Jonny Austin as stating, “We really wanted to be a game changer. Alongside our partners we wanted to recreate the buzz of the BBC Micro which was a product we all used as engineers and has shaped a lot of the programming skills we see coming into the industry today.”

 

  • An article from Gamasutra highlights ARM as a sponsor of the Virtual Reality Developers Conference, sharing, “Among them are tech giants Microsoft, ARM and Qualcomm, industry leaders who are invested in realizing the full potential of virtual- and augmented-reality technology.”

 

  • Several reporters including Agam Shah from PCWorld highlight the release of Nvidia’s ARM-based Parker processor for improved visuals and computing in autonomous cars, noting, “Parker has four 64-bit Cortex-A57 cores based on the ARM architecture, and two homegrown Denver 2.0 CPU cores. It has security layers to prevent the chip from being hacked, according to slides presented at Hot Chips.”
  • Many reporters including Jeff Burt from eWeek continue to highlight ARM’s Scalable Vector Extension technology, quoting a blog post by ARM Fellow Nigel Stephens, “Immense amounts of data are being collected today in areas such as meteorology, geology, astronomy, quantum physics, fluid dynamics and pharmaceutical research. Exascale computing (the execution of a billion billion floating point operations, or exaFLOPs, per second) is the target that many HPC systems aspire to over the next 5-10 years. In addition, advances in data analytics and areas such as computer vision and machine learning are already increasing the demands for increased parallelization of program execution today and into the future.”

 

  • Erich Styger from DZone News highlights the ARM Cortex-M processor, sharing, “The ARM NVIC is a very flexible and powerful piece of hardware. Nesting allows it to interrupt a less urgent, already running interrupt service routine.”

 

  • Sam Shead from Business Insider highlights Cambridge Innovation Capital which is funded in part by ARM, noting, “CIC set up with a £50 million fund with chip designer ARM and hedge fund Landsdowne Partners contributing to a pot of money that CIC had already sourced from its own funds.”

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