jensbauer posted 1 year ago
Yesterday I discovered Freescale's K10P32M50SF0; a very low-cost QFN32 M4, which can run at 50MHz. I'll probably try this one out. :)

12 Comments

  • jensbauer

    jensbauer 1 year ago

    That is ... the MK10DX32VFT5 to be precise.
  • jensbauer

    jensbauer 1 year ago

    Correction... MK10DN32VFM5 ; that's the QFN32. The MK10DX32VFT5 is the QFN48. :)
  • Alban Rampon

    Alban Rampon 1 year ago

    They are fun to solder at home ;) For the next challenge, you can try Freescale  KL03. Having said that, it seems that with a bit of glue, these chips do solder alright.
  • jensbauer

    jensbauer 1 year ago

    Depending on the weather, I think I could actually solder the MK10, as I've improved my equipment.
    Hmm, seems I already made a slim-line adapter PCB for it.
    Do you know if it can be programmed via JTAG, or if it only supports SWD ?

    That might be a challenge for those who solder wires directly onto a BGA chip, heh. :)
  • Lori Kate Smith

    Lori Kate Smith 1 year ago

    Let us know how it goes Jens:)
  • jensbauer

    jensbauer 1 year ago

    I definitely will; even if I fail to solder it correctly. ;)
    I've been speaking with Jaco, my PCB manufacturer, about making my adapter PCBs easier to solder.
    The next time I order, I will probably try making the required modifications, so that my QFN33 adapter will be more likely to solder successfully.
  • Lori Kate Smith

    Lori Kate Smith 1 year ago

    We look forward to sharing the adventure;-)
  • Alban Rampon

    Alban Rampon 1 year ago

    JTAG/SWD: On datasheet http://www.freescale.com/files/32bit/doc/data_sheet/K10P32M50SF0.pdf p54 pinout suggests SWD. Out of so few pins, you don't really want most to be taken by a debug interface, do you?

    BGA: if you don't shake too much, you could try some very fine coil wire. I have seen it, but I have not done it myself. Here is an example: http://www.xevel.fr/blog/index.php?post/2012/11/10/Deadbugging-fine-pitch-BGA 

  • jensbauer

    jensbauer 1 year ago

    You're absolutely right; I would definitely want to use SWD if I could.
    However, I have not been able to get SWD working with the LPC812 microcontrollers yet.
    As I know that I have JTAG working with all the microcontrollers I've tried, I'd like to use it in the beginning, until I can get SWD working. (There's something fishy going on with this comment-editor; when I press arrow-down, I can't reach the last 4 lines of this message. - not even after copy/clear/paste. This can be reproduced. I've saved the text-buffer in a local file.)

    Besides I'm only soldering it to a QFN-to-DIP adapter at first, so it'll drop right into the breadboard. :)

    BGA: Impressive! He can even turn that into a DIP8, if he wants to. :)
  • jensbauer

    jensbauer 1 year ago

    Note: Some LPC microcontrollers have both JTAG and SWD. On some of those, you can use both JTAG and SWD to flash-program/debug the chip. On others, you can only use JTAG for boundary scan, which means flash-programming can only be done via SWD. Looking at the datasheet, it's not completely clear if I could also use JTAG for flash-programming/debugging (in addition to using SWD).
  • Alban Rampon

    Alban Rampon 1 year ago

    I just came across a new way (for me) to solder SMD with hot sand and a frying pan... intriguing: http://youtu.be/OtrdsLLYAIM 
  • jensbauer

    jensbauer 1 year ago

    Normally I wouldn't do it that way, but actually it might be a good idea for small QFN, as the solder remains liquid until you turn off the bunsen burner. That allows you to correct the position if it's misaligned. It also allows you to easily see if the chip aligns itself.
    I recently soldered a 0.5mm pitch QFN33 (5x5). I haven't tested it yet, because I, ehm, seem to have lost that adapter with the chip on. :)
    I'll find it some day, I know I will.

    I did give up on the DSBGA (2x2BGA which is 0.7mm by 0.7mm)
    To practise before I bought one, I tried placing a grain of sugar exactly like I wanted it using tweezers.
    Almost impossible. Imagine you drop it on the floor (carpet); you'll never find it again. =P